Negotiation Quiz

Negotiation Quiz

Here's our little international negotiation quiz for you.  None of the eight questions are particularly tricky, but you may nonetheless find it a bit of a challenge to get everything right.  You'll get your answer directly after each question.

Ready?
 

[START]

Negotiation Quiz
 

1.  When negotiating in India, it is helpful to create a little time pressure on your counterparts.  You should announce that you have to leave soon or make an offer with an expiration date.
 
      yes    no

Negotiation Quiz
 

2.  In Israel, relationships exist primarily between companies rather than between individuals.  Accordingly, if your company replaces you with someone else, that person will usually be able resume negotiations close to where you left them.
 
      yes    no

Negotiation Quiz
 

3.  When bargaining in Japan, it can be beneficial to start with an extreme opening, such as offering $5,000 for something you think is worth $25,000, just to gauge their reaction.
 
      yes    no

Negotiation Quiz
 

4.  An oral commitment in Germany can be legally binding and your counterparts might sue you if you do not keep it.
 
      yes    no

Negotiation Quiz
 

5.  When trying to influence a person in China that you’re meeting for the first time, you may want to “blow your horn” a little.  Talking about the great results you achieved for your company and how highly respected you are at work will help build respect and trust.
 
      yes    no

Negotiation Quiz
 

6.  A Russian angrily walking out of the room during a negotiation indicates that the negotiation is over and that he/she will never re-discuss the deal with you.
 
      yes    no

Negotiation Quiz
 

7.  In South Korea, it is often better to meet with someone alone to discuss a business deal than to have a meeting between your team and theirs.
 
      yes    no

Negotiation Quiz
 

8.  In Brazil, you’ll want to openly share relevant information at the beginning of a negotiation, since that will help you win the trust and respect of your counterparts.
 
      yes    no

Correct!

[NEXT]

Sorry - that's not the best answer.  Creating time pressure when negotiating in India is not a good idea.  Indians may take that as a sign that you are only seeking one-sided short-term benefits and are not interested in a long-term relationship that is mutually beneficial.

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Sorry - that's not the best answer.  In Israel, relationships indeed primarily exist between companies.  This may be different with Israeli Arabs, though, who value personal relationships quite strongly.

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Sorry - that's not the best answer.  When bargaining in Japan, it would be a huge mistake to start with an extreme opening, since this may be very upsetting for your counterparts.  It is best to open with an offer that is already in the ballpark of what you really expect.

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Sorry - that's not the best answer.  An oral commitment in Germany can indeed be legally binding.  However, since they are often difficult to prove in a court of law, legal action over such commitments is rare.

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Sorry - that's not the best answer.  When trying to influence people in China, modesty and humility are very important.  Trying to impress them with your accomplishments can be very counterproductive as they may have little respect for you if you do.

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Sorry - that's not the best answer.  If a Russian angrily walks out of the room during a negotiation, he is likely just using a tactic designed to intimidate you and obtain concessions.  Stay and wait for his return, or leave for the day and re-open the discussion the next morning.

[NEXT]

Sorry - that's not the best answer.  Unlike most other Asian countries, in South Korea it can be more effective to discuss deals one-on-one rather than in teams.  This requires that a trusting relationship has been established.

[NEXT]

Sorry - that's not the best answer.  If you openly share relevant information at the beginning of a negotiation in Brazil, your counterparts will consider you naïve and may feel encouraged to take advantage of you through hard bargaining.


Thanks for taking our negotiation quiz.  We hope you enjoyed it.  If you would like to learn more about the subject of international negotiation, take a look at our workshop that is designed for people who work across international borders and organizational boundaries:

Negotiating And Working With International Customers,
Suppliers, And Partners

 

Correct!


Thanks for taking our negotiation quiz.  We hope you enjoyed it.  If you would like to learn more about the subject of international negotiation, take a look at our workshop that is designed for people who work across international borders and organizational boundaries:

Negotiating And Working With International Customers,
Suppliers, And Partners

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